Fred Hampton on Revolution

About This Item

Possible outtake from the 1971 documentary film 'The Murder of Fred Hampton', featuring an excerpt from a speech by Fred Hampton, in which he emphasizes his political views and priorities. Hampton was deputy chairman of the Illinois Black Panther Party and was killed in his apartment on December 4th 1969.

Originally aired on
Film Group, Inc. Chicago
Date aired
1971
Recording medium
16mm b&w, optical sound film
0:57
Rights for this video belong to
Film Group, Inc. Chicago
Type of material
documentary film
Identifier
BP12-2
Views
7268

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Comments

He said Bobby Seal, not fields

I and other people would appreciate it if you change this to read correctly; you are participating in libel when you don't portray his speech correctly. The whole speech reads exactly this: “Bobby Fields is going through all types of physical and mental torture but that’s alright. Because we stood here even before this happened and we’re going to (not sure of verb used here) after this and after I’m locked up and after everybody’s lock up, that you can jail a revolutionary but you can’t jail a revolution; You might run a liberator like Eldgridge Cleaver out the country but you can’t run liberation out the country; You might murder a freedom fighter like Bobby Hutton but you can’t murder freedom fighting; and if you do you’ll come up with answers that don’t answer, explanations that don’t explain, you’ll come up conclusions that don’t conclude. And you come up with people you thought should be acting like pigs; just acting like people and moving on pigs and that’s what we have to do. So we going to see about Bobby regardless of what these people think we should do. Because schools is not important and work is not important. Nothing is more important than stopping Fascism because Fascism will stop us all” Fred Hampton (August 30 1948- December 4 1969)

 

He obviously didn't say that "rules aren't important and words aren't important." He said that school and work are not important... meaning that it would be ok for them to protest those things 

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